Villanova University Mock Trial Team Participant Earns Top Award 

MTpic2017The Villanova University Mock Trial Team opened the 2017-2018 season in record-breaking fashion at the 2nd Annual Black Squirrel Invitational hosted by Haverford College during the weekend of November 4-5, 2017. Laura Wagner ‘20 CLAS became the first Villanova mock trial participant to earn a perfect score after two days and nearly 12 hours of competition. She was presented the Top Witness Award by tournament officials. The two-day national invitational featured 26 registered teams and nearly 250 individual competitors. The trip was sponsored through the generosity of The James F. and Ann T. Radecki Endowed Fund and supported by the Office for Undergraduate Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The team returns to action when it competes in the United States Regional Championships in February 2018. Michael J. Pennington, Director for Experiential Education & Pre-Law Advising Services, serves as Head Coach and Advisor.

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Communicating Your Value as a Liberal Arts & Sciences Student … in 30 Seconds or Less

By Kate Szumanski

Knowing your professional value and worth, and communicating powerfully about them in a very short amount of time, are two important skills liberal arts and sciences should master.

You need to write, memorize, and “own” your 30-second commercial, which is designed to sell you!

Let’s say you’re attending a career fair and approach a representative from a particular company. What do you say by way of an introduction? And after you exchange pleasant hellos and chit chat about the weather, what’s next? When you’re asked about YOU, what do you say?

This is where a carefully created and memorized elevator pitch or personal brand statement comes into play. You want to create something compelling, memorable, and brief that helps to describe you and your abilities.

Careers coach and author Susan Chritton shares these tips to get you started.

  • Your unique promise of value: This is the promise you make to your target market that your brand will fulfill. It clarifies and communicates what makes you special. You must be able to live up to this promise. What important abilities can you uniquely offer a company or organization that might be hard to find in the marketplace? This is your USP: unique selling point.
  • Your personal brand statement:You use your unique promise of value to write the all-important personal brand statement. When you work on your statement, envision your best self. To begin your thought process on what your brand might include, answer the following questions:
  • What three or four keywords describe your essential qualities quickly and clearly?
  • What is your essence factor, the core of who you are? “I know I am in my element when __________.”
  • What is your authority factor, the knowledge that you hold and the skills that you possess? “People recognize my expertise in _________.”
  • What is your superstar factor, the qualities that set you apart? (This factor is how you get things done or what you’re known for.) “People comment on my ability to ___________.”
  • How can you convey all of the above with energy, enthusiasm, and passion?

To help you get started writing your statement, use this fill-in-the-blanks template. Don’t be constrained by this language; simply use it as a starting point.

Hello. I’m _____________ _________________, and it wonderful to meet you. I am a __________ student at Villanova University, studying _____________ and _____________. I’m looking for _____________so that I can apply my ____________ skills and help you achieve your _____________ goals. I use my ___________ and ___________ for ___________. Known for ___________, I ___________. Using ___________ (key trait), I ___________, by providing ___________. Through my ___________, I ___________, when I serve ___________. I can make powerful contributions at ____________, an organization that I deeply admire because of ________________ by contributing my _________ and _____________ abilities.

Kate Szumanski, ’95, ’97, is the associate director for experiential education in the Office for Undergraduate Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Villanova University. Follow her on Twitter @KateSzumanski.    

Morgan Stanley Operations Division is seeking College of Liberal Arts and Sciences students!

Morgan Stanley is seeking College of Liberal Arts and Sciences students for a Summer Analyst position in their Operations Division. This is a prime opportunity for Villanova CLAS students to grow their career and professional development potentiality. The accompanying training program includes networking opportunities, professional skills training, team projects, and much more.

The full posting details may be found on the Operations SA Program PDF, and students must apply online HERE. Don’t procrastinate; build your future!

Achieving Professional Success With a Degree in the Liberal Arts and Sciences

By Kate Szumanski

Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Villanova University are often told that they can do and be anything, that with their excellent liberal education, they can work any job, excel at it, and be paid well for it.

Strong evidence suggests that this and more are true.

The Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) released a report in January 2014 on earnings and long-term career paths for college graduates with different undergraduate majors.

In How Liberal Arts and Sciences Majors Fare in Employment, authors Debra Humphreys and Patrick Kelly analyze data from the 2010-11 U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey and provide answers to some common questions posed by students, parents, and policy makers who are increasingly concerned about the value of college degrees.

Their findings are reassuring:

  • Liberal arts majors close earnings gaps—earn more than professional majors at peak earnings ages
  • Unemployment rates are low for liberal arts graduates—and decline over time
  • Liberal arts graduates disproportionately pursue social services professions
  • Many liberal arts and sciences majors also attain graduate and professional degrees and experience significant earnings boosts when they do
  • Graduate and professional degrees provide earning boosts for all; largest boost for science and math majors and smallest boost for professional majors

The report argues that “whatever undergraduate major they may choose, students who pursue their major within the context of a broad liberal education substantially increase their likelihood of achieving long-term professional success.”

In the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Villanova University, and in the Office of Undergraduate Students, we teach our students – liberally educated young adults – to be adaptable, nimble, and flexible students and professionals.

We want our students to realize their full potential, to discover their passions and to pursue them with relentless determination. Maybe it’s through an internship. Maybe it’s through a professional development course. Maybe it’s through one of our many professional development events. Discovering who you are and what your impact can be should help define your Villanova journey.

I encourage students to visit the Office for Undergraduate Students in SAC 107 often. Discover who you are and who you are meant to be. Let our office of dedicated professionals help you on your journey of discovery.

Kate Szumanski, ’95, ’97, is the associate director for experiential education in the Office for Undergraduate Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Villanova University. Follow her on Twitter @KateSzumanski.